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Early on in the pandemic, I challenged myself to read 60 books in 2020. 60 seemed like a stretch-goal in late spring (calculated then to be roughly 2 books per week). These books could be from any genre, any author (although I did give some preference to BIPOC and LGBTQ authors), any topic, and any length.

The goal of this reading challenge was two-fold: catch up on books on my “to be read” shelf (courtesy of GoodReads) and get back into a hobby that supported my mental health. As I write this post I have read 100+ books this year…

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https://www.eac.gov/voters/become-poll-worker

I was a poll worker in this recent 2020 Presidential Election cycle. Below are some of the take-aways I had from my experience (all are apolitical). Importantly, poll workers are commonly in short supply- if you are interested in becoming a poll worker in future elections go to the US Election Assistance Commission to learn more (some roles are paid!).

  1. First and most importantly, every single vote counts. It may sound like an adage, but it’s entirely true. For example, at the end of Election Day, our Dominion machine (one of the most common machines used by city and state…

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Tufts University (tufts.edu/visit)

In developing a cyber threat model for Tufts University, I chose to adopt the “Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity” (Version 1.1) as outlined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The Framework focuses on using “business drivers” (i.e. reduction of cost(s)) to guide cybersecurity activities and “considering cybersecurity risks as part of the organization’s risk management processes”).[1] The Framework consists of three parts: The Framework Core (Exhibit 1), the Implementation Tiers, and the Framework Profiles. I will focus specifically on building out the Framework Core in relation to threats from phishing and malware scams.

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© David M. Brear

Welcome to the age of Neo-Banks 2.0! I hope you can imagine such a welcoming in the voice of Jurassic Park CEO, John Hammond.

So, what makes this “age” of neo-banks different than the first? I argue that this new age is marked by 3 distinguishing characteristics: 1. A clear drive towards profitability, 2. Collaboration, not competition with existing legacy banks, and 3. A niche focus on a particular core competency or customer sect.

In sticking with the Jurassic Park theme, I’d like to recall Ian Malcolm’s famous “Could/Should Speech” in the 1993 film. Ian extolls, “Yeah, but your scientists…

As a kid, my mom would take me to Melrose Public Library at regular intervals during summer vacation- each visit was capped with a visit to “Sweet Spot,” a local penny-candy store (and, man, do I miss the flying saucers!).

After I had checked off my required school reading, I would dive into all the recommendations my favorite librarian had been saving for me throughout the year.

This summer, I challenged myself to read 40 books outside of the Fletcher/HBS curricula (and attempted to reconjure some of that adolescent summer nostalgia). You’ll notice I didn’t have a particular genre/author/writing style I preferred.

Below, in no particular order, are my summer 2020 reads

Let me know if you read any of them!

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The Big Reset

The Big Reset is an initiative by Josh Bersin Academy to re-think how we work with each other and technology while keeping a focus on promoting empathy and understanding in a post-COVID world. Josh puts it best, “The Big Reset is a reset of our expectations. Reset in our priorities. And a Reset in how we spend our time.” …

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(Joanna Andreasson. Source image: Sonate/iStock)

Introduction

Omar Marteen, the shooter at Pulse Nightclub and who massacred twenty-five individuals, was able to take out six lines of credit [across a roughly four-month period], including with a Mastercard, American Express card and three Visa cards to purchase the five firearms he used to carry out such a vile act.[1] Because not all states require mandatory background or credit checks before the purchase of a firearm and financial institutions do not share information that could potentially put them “on the hook” with authorities, a major impasse exists in blocking mass shooters from obtaining lines of credit.[2] Moreover, government…

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Stranger Things: Worlds Turned Upside Down (Gina McIntyre)

On March 25, 2020, due in large part to the economic repercussions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, interest rates on short-term treasury bills in the United States turned negative: Think the ‘Upside-Down’ in Stranger Things- an alternate, parallel universe where things (particularly, interest rates) don’t behave ‘normally’ (the Demogorgons, in this case, are the negative interest rates).

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Nanodegree Programs during COVID-19

By many estimates, even with prolonged voluntary & state-mandated self-quarantining in place, many workers in the US are expected to be out of work for 5–9 months due to COVID-19. If, as many epidemiologists predict, a resurgence of COVID-19, in the form of one or many “waves” occurs, this is likely to force workers to self-quarantine for up to 18 months.

A nanodegree is a project and skills-based educational credential program. A nanodegree is meant to help workers gain the credentials they need to advance in their current role (up-skilling) or switch roles enitrely (re-skilling). …

Brian Larson

All Things Future of Work. Master’s candidate at the Fletcher School at Tufts University

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